RANKED: March Releases of 2019 (Recap)

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(Claudette Barius/ Universal Pictures, 2019)

Higher, further, faster… yo, was that in reference to Captain Marvel or Dumbo? March 2019 has honestly been not too shabby for cinematic outputs. Either I have gone completely insane and love a bit of serial killer juiciness but it looks like Lars Von Trier and Jordan Peele won the month for me whilst the more, for lack of a better term, “kiddy” outings emerged as quite the all-time low for me. But whatever, I’ll shut up and show you exactly what I thought of how March 2019 in film went down.

#6 Dumbo [Kingdom of the Criminally Dull…]

A retreat from Tim Burton’s signature style for a more aesthetically flatter revisiting of the classic Disney animation; serviceable at its best, but never going above and beyond like its titular elephant.

#5 The Lego Movie 2: The Second Part [Kingdom of the Criminally Dull…]

An attractive animation with a charismatic cast that tries to make do with the tiresome and derivative Lego movie formula but ultimately loses its unique satirical humour purely because its no longer unique.

#4 Captain Marvel [A CRUSADE!!]

A bout of Marvel branded entertainment that pulsates empowerment in an ingenious 90s setting; despite weakly defined character moments, the film still manages to propel the MCU higher, further, faster into the future.

#3 Fighting With My Family [A CRUSADE!!]

An entertaining blend of heart and humour, brought to life by a united cast and script; attempting to make the best of its clichés, especially when riffing off its titular sport of WWE to separate the fixed from the fake.

#2 Us [Lost Art]

A suspenseful insight into the horrors of duality in our modern day climate with a high regard for grand cinema techniques; made unique by the other-worldly talent of Jordan Peele and a bone-chilling tour de force performance from Lupita Nyong’o.

#1 The House That Jack Built [Lost Art]

A darkly vile commentary on art and icons with a callous regard for audience comfort, in exchange for grotesque genius, built to withstand unease and humour in a self-portrait unlike any other.

 

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